Video and Radio Sued the YouTube Star: One year, $1 billion after the crackdown

Photo by Dylan Goldman

Photo by Dylan Goldman

This month marks the one-year anniversary since YouTube began actively policing copyrighted material via their Content ID System; a crackdown that, according to “Billboard Magazine”, has resulted in a $1 billion payout to owners of copyrighted material.

Plagiarism Today” author Andrew Flanagan explains that although development of the copyright protection system began in 2007, YouTube didn’t actively police the system until December of 2013. The YouTube Content ID system was released online in 2010.

In an interview with “The New York Times”, YouTube’s chief executive, Susan Wojcicki, explained how initially, YouTube was created as a platform for video hobbyists. The site’s developers hadn’t expected it to become what it has, so originally, there was no need to address digital copyright infringement issues.

Photo by Dylan S. Goldman. Digital piracy is a serious crime, punishable by law. The maximum sentence is up to five years in prison and up to $250,000 in fines.

Photo by Dylan S. Goldman. Digital piracy is a serious crime, punishable by law. The maximum sentence is up to five years in prison and up to $250,000 in fines.

However, the need to protect copyrighted content quickly presented itself when YouTube replaced MTV as the preferred forum for artists to release their music videos to the world.

“The reach is much larger online,” said local musician, Jennifer Summerville. “MTV could reach millions; YouTube reaches billions.”

Ironically, according to mtv.com, the network’s current programming has very little, or nothing, to do with music videos at all less one exception: pre-millennium sole survivor, “MTV Unplugged” (1989).

 

 

Local musician Jennifer Summerville, 36, supports YouTube's Content ID system, knowing that her copyrighted material is safe from piracy.

Local musician Jennifer Summerville, 36, supports YouTube’s Content ID system, knowing that her copyrighted material is safe from piracy.Photo by Dylan Goldman

“I remember running home from school so I wouldn’t miss the release of the newest video on MTV by…hell, whoever it was that week,” Summerville reflected. “It’s such a different world to grow up in today than when I was kid. I used to dream of the day I would see myself on MTV. Now, with YouTube, anyone can be a star.”

To quote the famous song by Bob Dylan: “The times, they are a-changin’”.

 


COPYRIGHT RESOURCES

copyright-registration-attorney-application-los-angelesAs we move further into a digital society, it is more important than ever for people, who use the internet for more than just email and chatting, to educate themselves on current copyright laws, digital and otherwise.

Here are some links to get you started:

ACE Search– search for musical copyrighted material as compiled by the American Society of Composes, Authors and Publishers.

Free and Legal Downloads– a comprehensive collection of free, legally downloadable music.

Copyright Search– Official U.S. Copyright Office search engine

Copyrighted.com– Free service that provides protection in the case of infringement or a discrepancy by providing proof that their work belonged to them on the date and time it is registered.

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